Are bright kids of color getting identified as gifted? Are they getting the knowledge they need to succeed? Ashanti Branch, MEd, Creator of the Ever Forward Club, explains how paper tests are likely not capturing the true gifts of these kids. Achieving big dreams and goals, based on what you're good at, involves trial and error and mentors who can lead the way.

Now we'd love to hear from you. What's bubbling up for you after hearing this vlog? Let us know in the comments section below!

 

3 Comments

  1. Gwendolyn Lewis on June 23, 2020 at 8:56 am

    I couldn’t agree more. I have seen young people fail academically because they felt they were not smart enough. They felt that way because their giftedness and creativity was recognized but not honored. The pressure to achieve was on academics only, without regard to the amazing ability they might have had to draw or to build or to give solace to another classmate who was hurting.

    • Lauren Hutchinson on June 23, 2020 at 7:31 pm

      Gwendolyn, I couldn’t agree more either. This loss of self-esteem can be catastrophic to some kids. Gifted students (with shiny spots in one or more areas) have needs that are not meet within the standard, one-size fits all, cookie-cutter educational environment or curriculum. It’s so important to recognize and nurture these talent and strength areas in all students.
      -Lauren with the B&Q Team

  2. Nancy Beland on June 23, 2020 at 5:28 pm

    Yes, social economic status, the color of your skin and being female or male sadly do still make a difference on testing and encouraging our kids to do their very best. I think we place too much value on intelligence. Characteristics of compassion, empathy, kindness, joyful ness, funny and the ability to love have been overlooked and our vitality within our communities have diminished.

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